pickledelephant:

Wong Kar-Wai and Christopher Doyle on the set of In the Mood for Love (2000)

(via full-cabs)

mckelvie:

I did a variant for Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips’ new book THE FADE OUT. The first issue is brilliant. 

2299comic:

Just a quick note to let you know that all proceeds from the digital comic — now available for purchase on Gumroad – are being donated to The Hero Initiative, a charity that helps comics creators in financial need. It’s a good cause and we thank you for your support in this.
You can’t have a future without a past. 2299comic:

Just a quick note to let you know that all proceeds from the digital comic — now available for purchase on Gumroad – are being donated to The Hero Initiative, a charity that helps comics creators in financial need. It’s a good cause and we thank you for your support in this.
You can’t have a future without a past.

2299comic:

Just a quick note to let you know that all proceeds from the digital comic — now available for purchase on Gumroad – are being donated to The Hero Initiative, a charity that helps comics creators in financial need. It’s a good cause and we thank you for your support in this.

You can’t have a future without a past.

“The flipside of that argument, perhaps, is that Wong’s films are so interconnected that one has to see them all, or a lot of them, to get the full effect, and that those who don’t make that commitment might be a bit adrift with any given individual film. Certainly, it’s hard to imagine getting a whole lot out of 2046 without having seen many of Wong’s earlier films first—it’s a loony apex of self-referentiality. Maybe that’s a limitation, but I don’t see it that way. Entering Wong’s world is always a pleasure, and his cast of characters and types—restless romantics, would-be noir adventurers, lovelorn cops and self-consciously posing criminals—all seem to be engaged in a search that, for Wong, might just be the essence of being human. The searching, restless quality of his films and his characters, the desperate desire for love, is a core human quality, which Wong’s characters simply express in more eccentric and dramatic ways than most, and Wong matches their inventive romantic gyrations with an equally exaggerated, expressive style. Film and characters together are striving for connection, remaking the world through the eyes of one hopeless romantic after another.”